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Finding Work

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Finding Work

Study upon study has shown that most jobs are not found on the Internet contrary to the image below.  (Yes, the person in the picture here is following the less effective of two methods–read on.)  Most jobs are found by a more proactive approach than just responding to what is known–that is, has been announced to the public through Internet and newspaper job classified ads and staffing firm listings–a reactive method.  Combining the two approaches is more effective.  Complicating the situation in some ways, staffing firms are playing a bigger role these days.

The first article in this section is a graphic representing how folks find work; it’s an attempt to show you these two ways–reactive and proactive.  Study it, and look for other articles in this section of the website to help you use both ways most effectively.

Here is a list of articles in this section–others are being added regularly.  While you are free to work through these articles in any order, they are sequenced in a recommended order so as to lay a foundation for your thinking and action.

  • How People Find Work (graphic)
  • Work Search Implications for each of the EYBP Strengths Combinations
  • Think Of Yourself As A Self-Employed “Free Agent”: TOYASE!
  • Annual Hiring Cycles (graphic)
  • Traits of Those Who Triumph Through Transition
  • Identify and Eliminate Your Barriers to Employment
  • Building Rapport is Essential to Finding Work and Networking
  • Coping with ‘Being-In-Transition’

A discussion about these diagrams and documents with your EaRN Coach will very likely help you make fullest use of the ideas contained in them.  They provide a framework for your work search thinking, planning and activities to find your next work assignment and keep yourself employable.

-Ken Soper, MA, MDiv, NCDA Certified Career Counselor (CCC)

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Career Planning

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Career Planning

Career Planning is a process, one that involves you in assessing your skills, aptitudes and interests, then determining the type work best suited for you, and finally identifying a path to get you there. Once on that course, it is a matter of continuing the planning process to help you progress within your chosen career. And it is a choice, as Swiss physician and counselor Paul Tournier said, “… to live is to choose.”

This section of articles, tips and exercises on career planning will help you understand, develop and refine your planning skills. They will be critical to your finding work and staying employable in the 21st century, an environment that is becoming increasingly flat and crowed with people who all need work to generate income. Included are charts and worksheets that will help you create “career security” as opposed to “job security”, which really is an oxymoron – it doesn’t and never existed.

“…plans are, bluntly speaking, strictly for the birds; once you have a written plan you may as well throw it out, because most of the time it is going to be absolutely wrong.  The great importance of planning lies in the fact that it is a continuous learning and decision making process.  As such, it is invaluable….”

– Rudolf Knoepel, Manufacturing Executive

The articles are arranged in a recommended sequence; however, you can work through them in any order.

Finally, I’ve found a person can have the promise of spiritual guidance and grace in Jesus Christ on a daily basis.  He calls us to…

“Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will direct your paths.”  (Proverbs 3:5-6)

and to…

“Commit to the LORD whatever you do, and he will establish your plans.  In their hearts humans plan their course, but the LORD establishes their steps.”  (Proverbs 16:3, 9)

-Ken Soper, MA, MDiv, NCDA Certified Career Counselor (CCC)